Still Good – A Review of “Still Alice”

Still Aliceis about a woman who has been diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease or EOAD. Alice has it all. A husband and three grown children. She’s a tenured professor of Cognitive Psychology and is asked to give speeches regularly. She’s noticed a few memory lapses, but thinks nothing of them until she gets loss in a place she goes to everyday for twenty-five years. When she is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease its a conflicted time for everyone. Not just her, but her husband and children as well. Will they be able to make it through or will she succumb without helping others like her?

First, I’d like to mention that this is a textbook for my Sociology class, but I decided to read it early.

Written beautifully in Third Person Limited point of view by Lisa Genova. She easily conveys the emotions that come with any disease as will as the ones that are specifically attached to Alzheimer’s. Alice goes through frustrations, fears, strain from memory loss, and others on a month to month basis.

Separating each chapter as different months was a good device for helping us mark the passage of time as we ourselves grow attached to her as if she’s our own family members and loved ones. We watch her deteriorate with her family and with Alice herself. It is displayed that the victims of Alzheimer’s goes through the same emotions we do, but fifty millions times stronger. You even hear from people from her support group who’ve known they might get EOAD before they get it. The struggles everyone suffer are realistic and strikes a chord in the readers.

You get to really know the characters we follow throughout their months:

Alice was a tenured professor of Cognitive Psychology who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. We follow through her point of view as we deal with her frustrations and rewards. Her ups and downs show us what a patient dealing with Alzheimer’s is really going through.

Joh is Alice’s husband who has to watch his wife deteriorate every day. Through him, though not the point of view character, you see how the direct caregiver goes through every up and down of his or her loved one.

Lydia is their daughter who decided to be and Actress. Through her we actually get to see how even though Alzheimer’s is devastating, it can bring family members together.

Anna is their other daughter who got her law degree before the start of the novel. She’s married to Charlie and through her we see how the burden of the knowledge that you may be diagnosed can weigh heavily on someone, but also how it is possible for the grandchildren won’t have to go through the same thing.

Tom is their son and he’s the medical student int the family. He also comes across as a playboy. Even though the joy of not having the mutation should have lifted the weight from his shoulder, but the knowledge that his sister did kept it there. Shows love, but also the misunderstanding that Alzheimer’s patients need to either rely on someone completely or be completely independent.

Charlie is the son-in-law who just has to go through the knowledge that he may lose his wife as he knows her.

There were many believable situations laid out for us, but I can’t believe that there were be such a large gap in support for the patients.  And if there were, then it may have taken longer for the social worker to get even permission to get permission for the other patients to contact Alice. Other than that, all was believable.

Still Alice gets 4.5 out of 5 bookmarks.

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About blackwinterrosethorn

I am an artist and a writer whose living in Virginia. I go to Hollins University and I am a double minor in Creative Writing and Music. I've been writing for about eleven or twelve years. I've been singing forever and I have been drawing and painting for four or five years. I am open to doing commissions and collaborative pieces. View all posts by blackwinterrosethorn

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