Monthly Archives: November 2013

Don’t be Overdue

There are somethings its easy to do for a head librarian to do, but is solving a murder one of them?

According to Jenn McKinlay in Due or Die, they’re more than able to juggle a new puppy, a job, and saving a friend from getting framed for murder. Lindsey, the library director in Briar Creek, Conneticut walks in with two friends on one’s murdered husband sitting in his chair. Its a race against the clock to solve the murder before someone else is overdue.

Now, before I begin: this book was given to me by my mother-in-law because it has a cookie recipe in the back. I now regret not writing it down before returning it to the library.

Anyways, I very much enjoyed this mystery novel. The pacing was fantastic and Heathcliff (the puppy) was very believable. If a pet chooses you, it’ll do anything to protect and love you. Lindsey learns that the hard way.

Every character was believable and I felt the frustration of having an attraction from a man who wasn’t showing his interest in dating her. Sully and Lindsey’s relationship was part of the nail-biting suspense. Every one of Lindsey’s friends added a bit of fun to the story, pulling more human characteristics out of our main character. The more human she seemed, the more I liked her.

The ending was hard to see coming, though once you know the ending (I’m not spoiling) you can pick the clues up easier.

Unfortunately, no story is perfect. Trust me, I wish this one was:

I felt more suspense from the budding relationship between Lindsey and Sully than I felt for every scene that was involved with solving the crime. Bulking up some of the supsense would have helped, because then I would have needed to keep reading. Instead, it was a “I’m really bored” type read. Due or Die wasn’t a poptart, but it wasn’t as much of a meal as, say a sandwich. It was kind of more of a bowl of Ramen noodles. Filling enough, but you always want more. I guess, its a good thing Ms. McKinlay has more books in the Library Lover’s Mystery series.

I give the book 4 out of 5 stars.

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A Well Spun Tale

Season of the Witch by Natasha Mostert is about a man named Gabriel, with a secretive past, who is put up against two extraordinary women. His old fling, Frankie, sends her husband, William, to get him to find his son, Robert. Robert’s been the cohort of two women with natures as different as the sun and moon. Gabriel finds himself getting to know these women, but what do they have to do with Robbie’s disappearance?

The book was phenomenal. To me the pacing was fantastically done, keeping the mystery up with clues. However, the clues are not these obvious pieces of literacy, but a hint of a fragrance in the mall. One recognizable, but you’re not sure where from. That is how a mystery and magical book is supposed to feel like. Natasha’s writing style is grand. You get impressive insight into each character, my favorites being Isidore and the two feisty witches. Morrighan and Minnaloushe Monk are these two larger-than-life women whose house is something from my dreams. I want to live in that house, with all the roses and spiders, etc. Morrighan is a risk-taking, daredevil and her sister is this sensual being that all women would love to be.

Natasha Mostert explores several ideas in the book that have their roots in history as well as academia. Everything from the US’ STARGATE program to the memory palaces of old are very well researched. She admits to expanding some connections to make the story smoother, but she does so with spider-like touches. Its like Goliath (the spider in the story that the Monk sisters own) is walking on every word of every page the concepts are mentioned. Season of the Witch makes me want to research it all myself.

I do have a couple of problems with the novel, because nothing is perfect. Gabriel was annoying to me. He did grow and becomes someone better, but the man was annoying me. I cared more about the diary entries and William than Gabriel. Gabriel’s problems didn’t mean a damn to me. As interesting characters go, Isidore should have been the one we saw anything through, but then we wouldn’t have actually had this story. Morrighan Monk was interesting and she does help the reader feel the exhilaration that comes with activities such as bungee jumping. Minnaloushe brings us the femininity that lies within all women. They’re like Yin and Yang. Gabriel did not feel like he was needed for anything more than to introduce these people to us.

Overall, though, it was an outstanding read. I just wish there were more books. There needs to be more about the sisters. Now, I do want to say that I think Natasha put herself in the book as a plucky blond with a kid who wants to write a book. See if you can find her.

I give the book 4.5 out of 5 stars.

 

Note: Thank you to my wonderful husband for the title of the review.

Also, you can find out more about Natasha Mostert on her website. Her Facebook is here. Her reader’s group is here.